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A Simple Site Map

Similar to creating a menu – creating a site map is even easier, there are modules that can do this but with a little preparation it can be very easy to create yourself.

To start we are assuming every template used for the pages includes some ‘base template’ for common aspects for all pages.

To do this, create (or select if already created) the Base Template with the information you want to have and to that base template, add:

InSiteMap: Checkbox

Then create or modify the Page templates with the other information you want. From those templates, click to the Content tab, and select the Base template to be included:

sitecoretemplatecontent

In the Standard values for the base template, you may want to have InSiteMap checked so that it will be on by default for all the pages.

For the sitemap itself, we’re going to create a rendering and then we can place it wherever we would like.

The rendering creates a basic nested list of all the items that have InSiteMap checked.

<xsl:template match="*" mode="main">
<
ul>
<
li>
<
sc:link select="$home">
Home
</sc:link>
<
xsl:variable name="hasSubItems" select="$home/item[sc:fld('InSiteMap',.) = '1']"/>
<
xsl:if test="$hasSubItems">
<
xsl:call-template name="subitems">
<
xsl:with-param name="itemparent" select="$home" />
</
xsl:call-template>
</
xsl:if>

</
li>
</
ul>
</
xsl:template>

<
xsl:template name="subitems">
<
xsl:param name="itemparent" />
<
ul>
<
xsl:for-each select="$itemparent/item[sc:fld('InSiteMap',.) = '1']">
<
li>
<
sc:link>
<
sc:text field="Page Title" />
</
sc:link>
</
li>
<
xsl:variable name="hasSubItems" select="item[sc:fld('InSiteMap',.) = '1']"/>
<
xsl:if test="$hasSubItems">
<
xsl:call-template name="subitems">
<
xsl:with-param name="itemparent" select="." />
</
xsl:call-template>
</
xsl:if>
</
xsl:for-each>
</
ul>
</
xsl:template>

Above we list the link to the home item in an unordered list:

 <sc:link select="$home">
Home
</sc:link>

<sc:link> with no parameters will link to the current item that is being processed by the xslt file – if not specified by any settings this will default to the page that the rendering is on. Since the current page is Not actually the home page, we are choosing to use $home as the source for the link (if the source for the link was actually in a field in the item you’d used field=”field name”).


Moving on, if there are any items under home that are listed as ‘InSiteMap’ it will call our template named subitems and pass the value for the parent of the item.

        <xsl:variable  name="hasSubItems" select="$home/item[sc:fld('InSiteMap',.) = '1']"/>
<
xsl:if test="$hasSubItems">
<
xsl:call-template name="subitems">
<
xsl:with-param name="itemparent" select="$home" />
</
xsl:call-template>
</
xsl:if>

Here the variable hasSubItems is created and the value for this is determined by any items within $home containing the field InSiteMap being checked (=’1’ – unchecked would be =’0’).


If we have any items that will be in the sitemap under $home, we call our template.


Within the template, we create a new unordered list, and then go through each item which will be listed in the site map and display a link using the ‘Page Title’ (this is any field that we want to have displayed to represent the item). We then check to see if we have any subitems to display and run the template again! With a bit of recursion, we head through all the items on the site as long as they and their parents have InSiteMap checked.


All that is left is adding the rendering to a page to be seen, and it will display a nested list of the pages on the site to be styled as needed!


Alternately, instead of checking for a selected checkbox, it could run through all pages with a specific template(or selection of templates) if you did not need to worry about excluding any specific pages that are using it.

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